Sunday, February 04, 2007

Yes and No


In a science lab, some experiments can go very well and others can go very wrong. That is the story of today's dyeing experiments. There is good news and there is bad news.

First the good...



As I have already stated publicly, I am a confirmed Kool-Aid addict. Today, I divided a skein of Paton's Merino in Winter White into three (almost) equal portions. Then I dyed them in Lemonade, Orange, and Cherry Kool-Aid. I am pleased with the outcome and I'm envisioning a Flame Hat, or maybe a Fake Isle, or maybe a stained-glass effect, or maybe....

Now for the bad news...

Today's dyeing experiment involved Wilton's Delphinium Blue. I used the same technique as with my Moss Green. Remembering that a little goes a very long way with the Wilton, I started with just a bit. The yarn kept taking up dye, so I kept adding more...about 3/4 teaspoon total. This was about four-five times as much as I needed of the green. Another odd thing was happening... the yarn was not turning blue. Instead, it was streaked with fuchsia. Even my spatula turned the same color.



I continued to work with it, hoping the blue would take over, but it just never did. When the yarn stopped taking up dye, it was an odd blue/purple and fuchsia streaked mess.



I am not at all satisfied with the results, and I am now curious why I got these results. (My science professors would be pleased.) I am guessing it had to do with the vinegar. Since this was the last of my recycled yarn from this sweater, I'll need to wait to do any more experimenting with the "Definately NOT Delphinium Blue."

5 comments:

cosette said...

hi jan, i find that my dye jobs that are the ugliest are sometimes the most interesting and become part of my best projects! don't give up on this skein yet. it just needs the right partner skeins.

Twitchy Knitter said...

It may not be what you envisioned...but I think it's beautiful. I love the purpley color it came out.

Jan-Knit said...

Thank you so much for the encouragement! I know it's an okay color....but I will still try again for that pretty blue! :o}

Anonymous said...

It's all to do with the Red #3 portion of the dye, which needs a different acidity from the blue components. The best answer to Red #3 issues I've seen is at http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=4268.msg1359299#msg1359299 - it's reply #866.

Jackie

Teresa said...

I've found that all the Wilton blues do that! I found the royal blue will separate into bright turquoise and fuschia depending on pH and temps!!! Keeping a constant, high temp, and acidity not too high seems to work best, I got a true royal blue that way. The higher the acidity, the faster the "strike", and the more likely to get separation :-( Leaving it overnight helps too.